The Gift of a Hat

The Gift of a Hat

I write this on the day before the October 2, 2021 Women’s March for Reproductive Rights, remembering my participation in the first Women’s March of January 2017.

I have the best hat in the world. It is black and sags a bit to the side giving it the air of a living thing that moves this way and that as I turn my head. read more…

Do I Bow or Can I Hug?

Do I Bow or Can I Hug?

Do I Bow or Can I Hug?

I pondered this question as I sat on the ten-hour flight from Los Angeles to Haneda Airport near Tokyo for our first ever visit to Japan. Tatsuya had been a twenty-nine year old businessman when he joined our family briefly in 1994. He came as part of a cultural program being offered to my school at no cost: read more…

Aunt Sherry’s Shoes

Aunt Sherry’s Shoes

My Aunt Sherry lives in Peter Cooper Village. That’s in New York City near the East River. I’m staying over this week because it’s my birthday and Aunt Sherry is making me a party. I’ll be four. I can’t wait to be four. I’ll be a big girl then.

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Artichokes, Anyone?

Artichokes, Anyone?

From The Play’s the Thing Children’s Series
This is an easy-to-read series for emergent readers. Written as short plays, it encourages parents and children to read together, each taking a role, to make learning to read an enjoyable collaboration.                                      
The Players:
Peter Beeper, the father
Rose Beeper, the mother
Mandy and Scooter Beeper, the twins

Scene I
(At the dinner table)

Mandy: I won’t eat it! It’s too… too…
Scooter: Prickly! I can’t eat food with prickles.
Dad: Now, kids. These are called ‘artichokes.’ read more…

Star Power

Star Power

It’s Only a Game

I was taught to see racism only in individual acts of meanness,
not in invisible systems conferring dominance on my group.

Peggy MacIntosh, White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack, 1988

I entered class that day with a bounce in my gait. My exit was less buoyant. I was about to be rudely awakened to the concept of privilege.

In the summer of 1973, I was a graduate student at Rutgers University read more…

The Storyteller

The Storyteller

I always wanted a sister. It wasn’t just that I was a lonely only child. There seemed something magical about having someone that lived in your house, knew all your secrets, and shared your parents. But more than that,

I was fascinated by there being a person on this earth that you could call, “My Sister.” It rolled off other kids’ tongues so naturally: “My sister had a birthday yesterday,” or read more…

Proof

Proof

Susannah reached into the laundry basket and pulled out the navy blue bra – the one she had been wearing for the last three days – and thought of Catherine. Catherine was the brilliant but emotionally fragile protagonist in the play, “Proof” by author/playwright David Auburn. Susannah had gone to see it the night before. It was the first production put on by the fledgling theatre company founded by her dear friend, Gayle, read more…

Polite Panic

Polite Panic

It’s fifty degrees and the March sun is shining. I put on my water-resistant cross-country ski gloves, take hold of a shopping cart, and pass through the automatic door. I am at my local Hannaford supermarket. read more…

One Fine Day

One Fine Day

It is September in the year of the pandemic. A summer of drought followed by torrential rains and high winds brought what seemed to be a sudden and cruel end to the fall foliage. Our majestic sugar maple read more…

‘Til It’s Gone

‘Til It’s Gone

Late last night I heard the screen door slam,
And a big yellow taxi took away my old man….

by Joni Mitchell

I never appreciated how much I needed toilet paper until I got to the store and found the paper aisle shelves bare and Amazon only

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